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Official David Bowie Website

Posts tagged 80s

Apr 6 '14

allthenobodyppl:

"When Julien Temple made his film of Absolute Beginners he asked me to take photos of all the cast members and I spent a week on the movie set taking portraits of all the actors. As well as appearing in the film, David Bowie had written the title song, and was going to make a video to promote it. The record ended up at number two on the single charts. The video was shot in a variety of locations around The Embankment of the Thames and although I had many great images from the video, David and I felt that we should shoot a special photo for the cover.

We set up our lights near the Houses of Parliament and waited for a break in the filming, but, not surprisingly, they were running late and we ended up taking the photo just as Big Ben chimed midnight. Given the time restriction, the photographs were done very quickly, but working with David is so easy that we only needed to shoot two rolls of film.

On seeing the contact sheets, there was one frame where he had this big smile, but his publicist told me that he would not approve it as he never smiled on his record covers. However, when we want through the photos together, David agreed that there was something special about this frame, and agreed for it to be used. To this day it’s the only time he ever smiled on a cover.”

- Chalkie Davies, Source.

Feb 15 '14
Aug 7 '13

portrait-in-flesh:

Hobowie (Hobo Bowie)

(Source: allthenobodyppl)

Jun 12 '13

On the Creation of Under Pressure.

allthenobodyppl:

In the summer of 1981, the British band Queen was recording tracks for their tenth studio album, Hot Space, at Mountain Studios in Montreux, Switzerland. As it happened, David Bowie had scheduled time at the same studio to record the title song for the movie Cat People. Before long, Bowie stopped by the Queen sessions and joined in. The original idea was that he would add backup vocals on the song “Cool Cat.” “David came in one night and we were playing other people’s songs for fun, just jamming,” says Queen drummer Roger Taylor in Mark Blake’s book Is This the Real Life?: The Untold Story of Freddie Mercury and Queen. “In the end, David said, ‘This is stupid, why don’t we just write one?’” And so began a marathon session of nearly 24-hours–fueled, according to Blake, by wine and cocaine. Built around John Deacon’s distinctive bass line, the song was mostly written by Mercury and Bowie. Blake describes the scene, beginning with the recollections of Queen’s guitarist:

We felt our way through a backing track all together as an ensemble,’ recalled Brian May. ‘When the backing track was done, David said, “Okay, let’s each of us go in the vocal booth and sing how we think the melody should go–just off the top of our heads–and we’ll compile a vocal out of that.” And that’s what we did.’ Some of these improvisations, including Mercury’s memorable introductory scatting vocal, would endure on the finished track. Bowie also insisted that he and Mercury shouldn’t hear what the other had sung, swapping verses blind, which helped give the song its cut-and-paste feel.

“It was very hard,” said May in 2008, “because you already had four precocious boys and David, who was precocious enough for all of us. Passions ran very high. I found it very hard because I got so little of my own way. But David had a real vision and he took over the song lyrically.” The song was originally titled “People on Streets,” but Bowie wanted it changed to “Under Pressure.” When the time came to mix the song at Power Station studios in New York, Bowie insisted on being there. “It didn’t go to well,” Blake quotes Queen’s engineer Reinhold Mack as saying. “We spent all day and Bowie was like, ‘Do this, do that.’ In the end, I called Freddie and said, ‘I need help here,’ so Fred came in as a mediator.” Mercury and Bowie argued fiercely over the final mix. At one point Bowie threatened to block the release of the song, but it was issued to the public on October 26, 1981 and eventually rose to number one on the British charts. It was later named the number 31 song on VH1′s list of the 100 greatest songs of the 1980s. “‘Under Pressure’ is a significant song for us,” May said in 2008, “and that is because of David and its lyrical content. I would have found that hard to admit in the old days, but I can admit it now…. But one day, I would love to sit down quietly on my own and re-mix it.”

Source: Open Culture.

May 28 '13

allthenobodyppl:

Five unique people, five remarkable encounters with Ziggy Stardust are revealed for the first time in a new TV film.

Rick Wakeman, 1971: He was to hit the big time with prog rock legends Yes. But in 1971 the classically trained keyboard player was still a relative unknown, despite having played with Bowie on the Space Oddity album in 1969. Then came the call to join him on Hunky Dory… (X)

Dick Cavett, 1974: When the U.S. chat show host whose fame rivalled that of Johnny Carson interviewed Bowie in late 1974, the star was at the peak of his drug mania. Cavett was understandably anxious… (X)

Carlos Alomar, 1975: He’s the guitarist who helped give Bowie his first U.S. No 1 single, Fame, and played on more of his albums than anyone. But his first thought on meeting him was that he desperately needed fattening up… (X)

Robert Fripp, 1977: The King Crimson guitarist - and Toyah Wilcox’s husband - is famous for his improvised playing on Heroes (1977) and Scary Monsters (1980). He recalls how Bowie made him an offer he couldn’t refuse… (X)

Nile Rodgers, 1983: When Bowie decided to make a dance album, who would produce it? It was obvious… the man behind disco giants Chic and Sister Sledge. (X)

Source: The Daily Mail

Apr 29 '13
allthenobodyppl:

MTV VJs’ book dishes on a battle with David Bowie…:

Before “Let’s Dance” came out, David Bowie did a press junket in a hotel room. It was one of those deals where interviewers file in one at a time. I had interviewed him before, on the radio, but I’m sure he didn’t remember me.
I said, “I have some tough questions for you, David — I hope you’re ready.”
And he said, “Ha, great, because at the end I’d like to ask you some punishing questions as well.”
That comment just blew by me.
At the end of the interview, he started asking me why there was such a dearth of black music on MTV.
I said, not trying to toe the corporate line but honestly, “Listen, if this was a radio station, we’d be a rock station. It wouldn’t make sense for us to play stuff that isn’t in our format.”
The conversation got around to Bowie saying, “Don’t you think there are black kids in the audience who would like to see some of these videos?”
I said, “Well, I guess so, but this is what we do, and we have to think about the audience that has cable.” A lot of times we were finding that cable’s heaviest subscribers were in rural areas where they couldn’t get any television reception at all, out in Oklahoma or whatever — not usually your biggest fans of urban music.
Bowie was hammering me, and I was trying to defend the network — but it was an awkward position.
What irritated me was that I felt like a pawn. I had no say over what MTV played — I wasn’t an executive. And Bowie knew what the situation was. He knew (MTV executive) John Sykes, and he knew a lot of the other principals. He was just using me to bring this issue into the forefront. I felt like an idiot, and I felt used, and I felt insignificant to David Bowie — which I probably was, anyway.
- Mark Goodman. Source.

allthenobodyppl:

MTV VJs’ book dishes on a battle with David Bowie…:

Before “Let’s Dance” came out, David Bowie did a press junket in a hotel room. It was one of those deals where interviewers file in one at a time. I had interviewed him before, on the radio, but I’m sure he didn’t remember me.

I said, “I have some tough questions for you, David — I hope you’re ready.”

And he said, “Ha, great, because at the end I’d like to ask you some punishing questions as well.”

That comment just blew by me.

At the end of the interview, he started asking me why there was such a dearth of black music on MTV.

I said, not trying to toe the corporate line but honestly, “Listen, if this was a radio station, we’d be a rock station. It wouldn’t make sense for us to play stuff that isn’t in our format.”

The conversation got around to Bowie saying, “Don’t you think there are black kids in the audience who would like to see some of these videos?”

I said, “Well, I guess so, but this is what we do, and we have to think about the audience that has cable.” A lot of times we were finding that cable’s heaviest subscribers were in rural areas where they couldn’t get any television reception at all, out in Oklahoma or whatever — not usually your biggest fans of urban music.

Bowie was hammering me, and I was trying to defend the network — but it was an awkward position.

What irritated me was that I felt like a pawn. I had no say over what MTV played — I wasn’t an executive. And Bowie knew what the situation was. He knew (MTV executive) John Sykes, and he knew a lot of the other principals. He was just using me to bring this issue into the forefront. I felt like an idiot, and I felt used, and I felt insignificant to David Bowie — which I probably was, anyway.

- Mark Goodman. Source.

Dec 21 '12

roleneart:

David Bowie Comic! The text is a quote of his from a 1997 interview. 

Dec 21 '12
Nov 30 '12

(Source: ennish)

Oct 12 '12

gothiccharmschool:

DAVID. BOWIE. Really, there’s nothing else that needs to be said. 

nightspell:

source - watoday.com.au